Does having a copy of a painting framed in your house equate with the real thing?

Words: 503
Pages: 2
Subject: Research Writing

PROMPT : In my lecture, I talk a lot about the circumstances for art production, as well as who we consider artists and what we consider art in my lecture. Technically, any form of creative expression is art, but we know that in the classical sense that is not true. Illustrate where do you stand on the issue, and give a rationale of why or why not you believe there are parameters for what we consider real “art”? Using an example of a non-traditional piece of art (you can even use something as far-fetched as my chipotle burrito example!) or a classical piece of art as an example to illustrate your point. **For responders, do you agree with this position? Why or why not? What about their example, is it compelling evidence to make the case?

The following aren’t necessarily prompts, but may be some questions you’d like to consider working into responses, as they’re quite interesting to consider:

Does a country have claim over artifacts and art excavated or taken from other countries? Why not give it back, and place in replicas? On that note, is seeing the Eiffel tower in Vegas the same as seeing it in Paris? This is getting into a discussion about authenticity, and how we as a society perceive of the concept of the original.

Does having a copy of a painting framed in your house equate with the real thing? Clearly its not worth the same amount of money, but why not? So we can see the concept of priceless art is beyond just appreciating a kind of art, its about authenticity right? Again, its as much the person as it is the piece of art

What would happen if we found out that DaVincis sister painted the Mona Lisa? What would happen if all of Shakespeares plays were written by his mother? What would happen if it was revealed that Francis Ford Coppolas sister actually directed his godfather trilogy? What would happen to great art if it was revealed to be done by a woman? It is really interesting to consider the social ramifications of these kinds of discoveries. Do they suddenly lose value, either socially or economically? Would the Mona Lisa draw the same crowd at the Louvre every day?