Provide an analysis of the short story assigned by your instructor. This is not a summary. Make sure that you offer an interpretation of the short story and that you read between the lines.

Provide an analysis of the short story assigned by your instructor. This is not a summary. Make sure that you offer an interpretation of the short story and that you read between the lines.

Professors Instructions

Here’s the number one rule for our discussion boards: Please, please please…do the reading.

I remember going on dates (barely) and she’d bring up a movie. Maybe I thought I saw it. Or maybe I just wanted to keep the conversation going. So, I’d nod and say it was great. Then she’d launch into this story about the movie. The story, the actors, that one part where so-and-so did such-and-such. How the movie changed her whole life.

And I’d just keep nodding, thinking dude, I have no idea what she’s talking about.

Not a great experience.

And speaking of dating, and the unpredictable paths that lead us to love, what did you make of “Two Nurses, Smoking”? When I first saw that in the New Yorker, I immediately flashed to the WCU parking lot, and the corner where smokers were banished. How many times did nursing faculty shake their heads in staff meetings, looking for ways to get smokers even farther from the building? And that’s one of my takeaways from the story. Distance. Separation. And the way those things actually bring people together.

How are Marlon and Gracie isolated? From their patients? From their own past? Do you find this story romantic? Does it make you proud to be a nurse or does it give you some pause?

Which brings us to rule two: This is our space to talk about the readings. To ask questions, to make connections to our own experience. It’s great to bring in a quote and show off some literary analysis. Complete sentences are nice (though I’m not setting much of an example in this post). But be honest and tell me how the reading strikes you, what you liked and didn’t like, what hit a chord or pissed you off. (Just remember your manners!)

Rule number three? Don’t just talk. Listen, too. Try to engage your classmates. Don’t think of your first post an something you write in a vacuum. Look at what else has been said and build of that, letting your classmates inspire some new ideas.